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Photo memories of heliskiing in Canada during La Nina

  
  
  

The snow is piling up in the legendary ski paradise of the Columbia Mountains - another La Niña winter in the making.

Last winter I was fortunate enough to sample three different CMH areas during photography projects.  It was also the best winter anyone could remember since the 70s; a La Niña winter - the same climate phenomenon meteorologists are predicting for this coming winter.

I know it is almost cruel and unusual punishment to post these photos right now, when most of us haven’t yet even buckled a ski boot, but I couldn’t resist.  Not only do these photos illustrate a La Niña winter of heliskiing in Canada, they also reveal the quality of the snow that brings skiers from all over the planet to taste the world’s greatest skiing.

February 28, 2011,  CMH Cariboos:
Cariboos lanina heliskiing powder

A short break between storms in the Cariboos had left a carve-able surface on solar aspects, but then another 30cm of low-density snow fell on the crust.  Combined with -20C temperatures, the result was fast skiing and a swirling powder cloud that would twist and dance hypnotically after the skier had passed.  I tried a few shots from below, but this one, looking down at the skier, best revealed the snow dance.

March 7, 2011,  CMH Gothics:
Gothics lanina helicopter snowboarding

Then it snowed for another week.  Our first day in the Gothics dawned crystal clear.  Even the most veteran guides and skiers were giddy at the breakfast table.  Good stability, deep snow, and the massive Gothics terrain in the southern Monashees awaited.  The day was like a dream.  Not only did we ski CMH’s longest run, Thierry’s Journey, we skied it three times.  After weeks of low visibility flying, the pilot was having a blast too.  He dropped us off on tiny summits, plucked us from the deepest valleys, and was grinning as widely as anyone on the mountain.  Here, the Gothics chef gets a few hours of dreamtime before going back to the lodge to prepare a gourmet dinner to give the rest of us the perfect ending to a perfect day. 

April 12, 2011, CMH Adamants:
Adamants LaNina heliskiing

An assignment from Skiing Magazine, to tell the story of the the unprecedented CMH Heli-Assisted Ski Touring program, gave me another week in ski-topia.  While we all anticipated spring conditions and corn snow, it was not to be.  Instead, La Niña delivered deep powder conditions until well after the last week of the CMH season.  I didn’t hear anyone in the group whining about skiiing in the Adamants during the winter that wouldn’t end. 

At CMH Revelstoke, there is already a skiable base in the backcountry, and check out today’s 5-day Revelstoke weather forecast!  S-N-O-W!

National Geographic’s skiing Top 10 forgot about the skiing

  
  
  

A recent article in National Geographic on the world’s Top 10 Ski Runs and Lodges brings to mind snow-laden luxury accommodations below mountains laced with fantastical ski lines.  We’re proud that Western Canada’s very own Whistler/Blackcomb and the Fairmont Chateau Whistler tops the list, and even closer to home, Banff/Lake Louise and the Fairmont Banff Springs (though not exactly slope-side) is number five.

Interestingly, the article, while it contains “ski runs” in the title, doesn’t mention a single ski run, nor does it include heli-ski areas.   The reader can only surmise that the writer intended “ski runs” in the most general sense, and not singular spectacular ski runs.  Which for me, as a skier, was a bit of a disappointment.  I was truly curious what the iconic National Geographic's list of the world’s top 10 ski runs would include. 

monashees heliski lodge

Photo of the CMH Monashee Lodge and behind it the kilometre-tall ski run known as Elevator - a ski lodge and ski run that many have called the best in the world.  Maybe next time National Geographic will include heli-skiing in their selection...

It's obvious why the article didn't include heli-skiing - heliskiing is so much better than resort skiing as to make comparisons seem absurd.  What can compare with the CMH tenture?  It is bigger than the rest of North America's ski areas combined!

Also, I can see why the writer chose to weight the article towards lodging rather than skiing.  It’s much harder to give both lodging and skiing equal weight in such a selection.  Even within CMH there are sometimes heated conversations, especially among the 3,921 guests who have skied over a million vertical feet with CMH, debating which is the best CMH area.  Most understand that the whole discussion is subjective, and many ski at different areas every time, but each CMH area has its committed fans who have skied millions of vertical feet exclusively at their favourite CMH area. 

So, if you asked CMH heli-skiers and snowboarders to pick their favourite ski run and lodge, which would they choose?  The skiing is great everywhere, so some pick their favourite area based partly on the view from the lodge, and pick the Bugaboos or Adamants; others choose based entirely on the volume of steep tree skiing they can shred in a week, and might vote for Galena, Kootenay, or the Monashees; still others choose based on the variety of terrain they can encounter and might pick the Cariboos, Gothics, Bobbie Burns or Revelstoke; some like the most private luxury and mountain experience and would pick the private heli-skiing areas of McBride or Valemount

Really, such a thing is utterly impossible to judge fairly.

But it’s fun to consider.    So, just for the fun of it, what is your favourite CMH ski run and lodge?

 


Private Heli-skiing in McBride: Heli-skiing's Huge Secret

  
  
  

This summer I ran into mountain guide Andi Kraus during a CMH Summer Adventure in the Bobbie Burns, a program that rivals the early days of heliskiing in terms of excitement and unprecedented adventure innovation.  We flew on ziplines, hiked on ice, and explored the tundra.  One sunny day, Andi turns to me and says, “You know, Topher, McBride is the best secret in heli-skiing.”

McBride heliski terrain valley

I had to find out a little more, so I tracked down Andi this fall.  Andi knows a thing or two about skiing secrets.  He was born in the German Alps, in a town where Olympic gold medalists have learned to ski.  He began skiing at age three and eventually worked as director of the local ski school and coach for the racing club. 

Later, mountain guiding took Andi to places far from his Bavarian home, including the Himalaya and Canada.  Fifteen years ago Andi began guiding for CMH and has never really looked back.  He has guided skiers in most of the CMH Heliskiing areas, but considers himself a McBride guide.

TD: What impresses you most about the mountains in McBride?
AK: I really like the roughness of the mountains in McBride - the massive alpine faces combined with long avalanche paths. There are no roads or logging - just pure nature all the way from the high alpine down to below treeline.

The Cariboo Mountain Range in general is just made for skiing. The U shape of the valley's give you endless opportunities to find routes and pickups along the way.  I like the complexity of the terrain from open glaciated alpine down into awesome tree skiing below treeline.  The variety in terrain and incline gives you an endless ski playground.

McBride heliskiing private alpine

TD: From where you are heli-skiing on most days, how far is it to the nearest ski tracks beside your own?
AK:  McBride is the biggest area within CMH and since we are a private area we only see our own tracks most of times.  McBride is located in the North Columbia north of CMH Valemount and Cariboo lodges.  Sometimes we hear their helicopter but we never see their tracks.

TD: How is guiding in MB different from the other CMH areas?
AK:  Since we are the only group operating in this massive area, we have the possibility to pick and choose without worrying about conserving snow for other skiers on any particular day.  We have great terrain knowledge like the other CMH heliskiing guide teams, but a bit more flexibility, and easy communication and understanding within the guiding team since there are only two of us and the pilot.

Also, Kevin Christakos, the McBride manager, and I work really well together. The other CMH operations have great guiding teams with great communication skills as well, but a small team makes everything simpler.

TD: For more relaxed skiers, is it hard to keep up with the pace of private groups, or is it easy for individuals to take their time on a run?
AK: It is easy to for different skill levels to fit in.  This is the beauty in the private groups, you pick and choose your own pace and terrain.

McBride private heliskiers

TD: For aggressive skiers, do you have more latitude to play around than with typical heliski groups?  Provided you stay under the guide’s watchful eye, of course.
AK: Yes, absolutely. For example, we have a group that has come to McBride many times, and they are all fast skiers, so in a week we ski between 90,000 to 100,000 meters, 24-25 runs a day.  Of course weather and snow changes things, but those numbers are an average what we ski with those guys. They ski steep and deep, fast and slow - what ever they want.

TD: Anything you’d like to add?
AK: CMH McBride is a hidden gem - lots of people don't know about it or ignore it. I think McBride has a great skiing future.  There is no other area in CMH where you can still establish so many new ski runs as in McBride - and this is what I love about it: looking at terrain and seeing a ski line and when conditions are right, to go and ski it.

The biggest tenure in CMH.  Just one group of skiers. Private luxury lodge with a private chef.  Andi might be right: private heli-skiing with CMH in McBride could be the best kept secret in heli-skiing.

Photos of CMH McBride heli-ski terrain by Andi Kraus.

The Trouble with Skiing and Snowboarding

  
  
  

Even before I started writing about snow sport, I was frustrated by the fact that snowboarding and skiing have two different names.  It makes the whole discussion around the two colossally worthwhile ways of playing in the snow so very awkward.

ski snowboard debate Take for example the phone conversation that begins many a day on the slopes:
You want to say, “Hey bro, wanna go skiing tomorrow?”

Immediately it’s hard to know what to say.   He rides a snowboard, but you ski.  What do you say? 

If you say, “Do you want to go snowboarding?” when you’ll be on skis, that doesn’t sound quite right either. 

Then there is the whole discussion around the sport that is unnecessarily difficult.  Take for example the snow sports industry.  One time I was at the SIA Tradeshow, and ended up in a conversation with a representative of a famous snowboard company.  I mentioned “heli-skiing”, and he immediately held up his hand, corrected me with “heli-snowboarding” and gave me a disapproving look.

It seems like things are changing, and many powder hounds, one boarded or two, have come to the conclusion that besides the physics of the ride, experientially there is really little difference between the two.  Sure, skis are better for moving around in the backcountry, and snowboards are better in crud, but both are simply bitchin’ ways to play in the snow.

It was a snowboarder who showed me the light.  My friend Karl, a snowboarder, called me one day to see if I wanted to go shralp some pow.  “Do you want to go skiing?” he asked.  Then, throughout the day, when we scored an especially nice run, he’d say, “The skiing on the left was totally untracked, let’s ski that again.” And at the end of the day, “Killer ski day, thanks for driving!”

Later, I had a conversation about it with Karl.  “Why do you call it all skiing?” I asked.

He shrugged his shoulders and replied, “It’s all the same.”

Years later, I met another group of people who felt the same way: the CMH staff.  For them, it is all quite simply, fantastically, skiing.  And why shouldn’t it be; when you’re going out and frolicking in bottomless fluff on some of the most spectacular ski mountains on planet earth, why get too caught up in the nomenclature. 

In snow like the above photo, at CMH Cariboos, half the time you can’t even tell what someone is riding on anyway.  Any of you snowboarders or skiers out there have an issue with calling it all the same thing?

Ski Movie: Heli-Skiing in the Cariboos and Twins

  
  
  

It's time for another vintage ski movie installment from Dick Barrymore. In the last post we checked out the start of CMH and the building of the Bugaboos. This segment covers the building of the Cariboos Lodge. Also, in honor of Andy Mahre coming back to film another Warren Miller segment in the Monashees, this segment features his dad, Steve, and Uncle, Phil, skiing with us back in the day.  Tyler Ceccanti from the K2 Factory team will be skiing as well for the upcoming film shot.

Watching the Mahre brothers ski you realize a couple of things. One, ski racers, no matter what era, just can flat out ski. Two, DNA sort of helps...you can see where Andy Mahre gets his skiing chops.

So check out the movie. Enjoy the classic soundtrack and classic ski fashion.

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