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What does a cowboy with a PhD have to do with Heli-Skiing?

  
  
  

The story of food at CMH goes back to the 1960s and the very beginning of Heli-Skiing. At that time the Bugaboos was the only place in the world to go Heli-Skiing, and all the food had to be brought in, mostly canned, at the beginning of the season while the road was still open.  Once the snowdrifts closed the road, a crate of fruit once a week was the only fresh food resupply.

Over nearly 50 years CMH Heli-Skiing has found it necessary, in order to provide such excellent and responsible cuisine in such outrageous locations, to take the CMH story far from the mountains into the world’s most progressive fisheries, ranches, farms, vineyards, coffee roasters, cheese-makers and olive oil producers. To put it simply, not every food supplier is up for the task of providing high quality, responsibly-sourced foods to some of the planet’s most remote world-class kitchens.

Cariboo lodge

Yesterday I talked to Christoph Weder, the mastermind behind Heritage Angus Beef, a conglomerate of Canadian ranchers committed to raising cattle at higher standards than even the “organic” certification requires, and the source for all the beef prepared in CMH Lodges.

You’ll never meet a more committed cowboy than Christoph. He calls himself Dr. Moo after an education, both practical and institutional, that has given him a PhD in Animal Range Science and made him the proud owner of Spirit View Ranch, a free-range cattle outfit in Northern Alberta and one of the 20 ranches that make up Heritage Angus. His efforts have garnered several national awards including the Alberta Beef Producers Environmental Stewardship Award.

“The people who buy our beef,” explained Dr. Moo, “want more than hormone and antibiotic free beef - they want ranching done with consideration for wetlands and natural habitat, and without overgrazing and inhumane treatment of the animals; they want fair trade for the ranchers and animals that spent the most possible time foraging and the least possible time in the feedlot.”

CMH beef

Dr. Moo’s recipe for excellent Canadian beef is working, and now Heritage Angus sells beef to Italy, Switzerland, Germany, Denmark, Czech Republic, Holland and France as well as the US and Canada. Heritage Beef’s blog, The Trail, is an insight into what it takes to provide the best possible beef as a Canadian rancher - from counting herd losses due to wolves one week, to touring the finest restaurants in Europe’s most cosmopolitan cities the next. 

He explains his approach, in which he distills a lifetime of education and passion into a simple philosophy: “If you’re going to raise beef, raise the good stuff. If you’re going to eat beef, eat the good stuff. If the good stuff is expensive, eat a little bit less.”

Like so much of CMH Heli-Skiing, the network of passionate individuals and complex systems that makes it tick goes largely unseen, but once you dig into the story, it makes perfect sense. Christoph “Dr. Moo” Weder’s story isn’t so different from the story of CMH. In his blog he writes:

“It’s a busy schedule running a branded beef program, being a father, husband and also running a ranch… I spend many, many hours of the week in the office 15 feet from the kitchen table talking to customers and working with the partners of Heritage Angus… sometimes more than I would like, so when the opportunity comes to get in the saddle and get out with the cows I am all over it. September is some of the prettiest times of the year to be out on the range…. its a time for reflecting back over the past summer and for seeing if all the best laid plans turned out…. I love to see how well the calves have grown how the grass held up and what the cows look like as we head towards winter.  Being a real rancher and being a partner with nature is something the ranchers of Heritage Angus are all very proud of. …. Heritage Angus Beef is not a spin doctored brand… it is real ranchers and real families that are proud of being part of something good.”

CMH mealtime

Hans Gmoser, the founder of CMH Heli-Skiing, or today’s mountain guides and CMH staff, could just as easily have written something very similar about running the world’s biggest Heli-Ski operation, and the pleasure of getting “in the saddle” after a hectic day in the office or the sentiments of being partners with nature and being real families that are proud of being part of something good.

Dr. Moo ended our conversation with this: “The partnership we have with CMH is one we’re really proud of, and it’s fitting with their international guests who get to visit these far-away mountain lodges and experience some really good Canadian food.”

Photos of CMH Cariboo Lodge and well-nourished CMH guests by Topher Donahue. Spirit View Ranch photo courtesy of Christoph Weder.

Layering infographic for skiing and snowboarding

  
  
  
spring skiing clothing

The team at Snow and Rock, the UK outdoor sportwear icon, with help from the graphics team at Confuesed.com, put together a visual tool to help skiers, snowboarders and other winter sports enthusiasts dress properly.  While experienced skiers and snowboarders will find only a few new techniques here, for people new to the winter game this infographic is a wealth of wisdom.

Here at CMH Heli-Skiing, we’re entering our most diverse weather season: spring. That means we’ll often start the day under sunny skies with warm temperatures, and by afternoon a convective snowstorm will roll in and both the temperature and snow will fall dramatically.

Layering, as shown in this infographic is the key to being comfortable, especially in the springtime.  While a heavy winter coat might work during a frigid January day of Heli-Skiing, in the springtime the coat will be not give you enough versatility for the diverse weather conditions.  Instead, layer for success and comfort, and adjust the layers as needed throughout the day.

In addition to the suggestions in this infographic, remember that the soft shell jackets that are so popular for aerobic winter sports like ski touring and nordic skiing are not waterproof enough to keep you dry during a full day of Heli-Skiing in heavy spring snowfall. Savvy skiers will use a softshell for ski touring, but then break out the waterproof hard shell for deep powder Heli-Skiing.

Winter sports clothing guide
Brought to you by Confused.com and Snow + Rock

Photo of spring ski conditions at CMH K2 by Topher Donahue.

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