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Fat ski technique for Heli-Skiing

  
  
  

Ski technology is red hot. It allows the pros to ski big mountain lines like tow in surfing helps surfers to charge the biggest waves. It gives old-timers (and their knees) an extra ten years of skiing. It made skiing a sexy game in the terrain park and turned skiing cool again.

But in the world of deep powder heli-skiing, is the modern ski technology always better? And are there ways to ski better and safer on the fat, rockered skis that are so much fun, but tend to go so fast?

fat ski riding

To find out, I tracked down Dave Gauley, the Assistant Manager at CMH Cariboos and a former ski pro famous for making smooth, casual turns on outrageously steep lines. Here’s what he had to say:

“Fat skis are a bit of a double edged sword, especially for the beginner to intermediate skier. They make it easier to float through almost all snow conditions  - except for a few. Most notably in Heli-Skiing is the snow you run into when several lines converge to a shared pickup. Hard packed,  bumps, chopped up snow, etc. You are cruising along easily in the pow... then whabam! It's suddenly a bit of an epic to control those big skis in the chop. Strained knees, back etc. are possible if you’re not ready for it.

“This kind of snow on fat skis requires a different approach. What I do is when I see a section like that coming up, is to realize the run is over and I just eat up the vertical by skiing slow with big round turns.

"The other problem with fat skis is the increased speed they generate. Skinnier skis sink more, so the snow pushing off your body slows you down. Not so with the fats.

“For beginner powder skiers, you need to vary the shape of your turn to keep your speed managable. To slow down, let your skis come around a bit more in the turns and come up with a way to dump speed if need be. I use a scrub technique of a quickly throwing the skis sideways like a partial hockey stop to loose a lot of speed quickly - not always easy in the trees. Try to anticipate, and always looking ahead will really help out. Many times in the trees I will straight line sections to get to an open area where i can then dump some speed.

"Another consideration is the weight of these new skis. A pair of K2 Pontoons is pretty darn heavy, probably almost twice the weight of a pair of the Heli Daddy's we were using ten years ago. Combine that with the increased speed, you have quite a bit of potential torque on the knees.

"Overall, you can't just saddle up and rock a pair of fatties. A completely different approach, and set of eyes for the terrain is required to do it effectively."

fat ski technique

For another perspective on the double-edged sword of fat skis, I talked with Lyle Grisedale, the shop tech at CMH Revelstoke. Lyle had this to add:

Fat Skis - I have mixed views on the really big fat skis especially for weaker skiers. They are an asset for weaker skiers in that they are not as deep in the snow and can be turned more easily. On the other hand, when you are not so deep in the snow you also go faster - not good for a weak skier on a steep tree run. Because of the speed, these skiers have to work the ski harder in order to slow down, which is tiring.

If guests are struggling on the fat skis, I often take them off of the fat guys and put them back onto the Heli Daddys or another mid-fat, which are easy to turn and easier to control speed. On big wide open slopes and glaciers, the big fats are fun to rip on, doing fast big turns with little effort involved to turn them.

Rockered Skis - I am not a fan of rockers for weaker skiers. Sure they make skiing easier, but for weaker skiers the rocker causes them to be back on their heels, which is hard on the quads. Also, for skiers who learned to ski 20 or 30 years ago ( a majority of our guests) they where taught to use tip pressure and other skills, and it is really hard to get any tip pressure on rocker tips and this is frustrating for carvers. Technique must be adjusted to a more swivelling or smearing of the ski type of attack. This works well, but is a big adjustment for a carver.

Interestingly, when CMH moved to mid-fat skis, staff spaces decreased as the guests could stay out longer before getting tired. Last winter I found that people were getting tired because they are going too fast on the fattys and are working too hard to control speed and to turn using techniques that are not the same as the techniques that they use on groomed runs.

The people who most enjoy the big fats are the younger skiers who are stronger, fitter, and less fearful of going fast."

Lyle offered these tips to help enjoy the pleasures of a fat ski while minimizing the work and leg strain:

  • On steeper treed terrain, make lots of turns to keep speed comfortable.
  • Use a good athletic stance with the hips above the feet for quick reactions to changes in terrain and snow texture. 
  • Upper body should be facing down hill most of the time, but don’t over rotate your shoulders or hips or the fat skis will run away on you. 
  • Avoid the back seat, otherwise the skis can't be controlled and manoeuvred optimally. 
  • Equal weight on both skis with a little more pressure to the outside ski produces the best results.

For skiers of all abilities who want to improve and would like their CMH Heli-Ski week to include both epic amounts of powder skiing as well as customized instruction in powder skiing technique, the CMH Powder University programs offer a new-school curriculum for all types of skiers and snowboarders.

Photos of fat ski powder harvest by Topher Donahue.

Comments

Great information Topher! And very timely. I plan on sending this out to all my guests. 
Thanks, 
Brad
Posted @ Tuesday, November 13, 2012 10:45 AM by Brad Nichols
Excellent advice. We noticed last Christmas, on our first ever CMH heli-skiing trip (Powder Intro) that the skiers with the "super-fat" skis missed out in two ways. One, they skied MUCH faster because the skis floated right on top of the powder, and in the trees this can be difficult (especially for beginner heli-skiers); and two, even on the wide open slopes they missed the fun of sinking into the snow and rising - that lovely floating / flying feeling. 
 
Also I could not agree more with Dave's advice. Sometimes the run ends well above the pickup and your best bet when skiing through packed crud in the trees is to take it slow and easy. 
 
Can't wait for our next trip (Revelstoke).
Posted @ Wednesday, November 14, 2012 5:28 AM by Peter Forrester
What I am really missing with the big fats is the feeling of deep powder rushing along your legs and maybe hips because you are skiing on and not in the snow. I am preferring alittle bit skinnier skis even in deep powder and even more on a harder pack where you have to use the edges sometimes. The wider the ski the more they are taking away your power when you have to keep em on the edge.
Posted @ Wednesday, November 14, 2012 6:19 AM by Michael Gaebel
Good advice, thanks for sharing.  
Another option for those struggling with speed is to try a little shorter length ski. Many older skiers seem reticent, remembering old lengths. Short and fat has way more surface area than long and thin had back in the day... and you sink a little deeper. 
tj
Posted @ Monday, November 19, 2012 9:38 AM by Tom Jackson
I bring my own Solomon Czars, which are more mid-fats, and I love them. I do sink more into the snow, and can control speed better, and can carve the turns. I tried high rocker skis and don't like them, and I don't like really fat skis because they sit too high and go too fast. 
Posted @ Wednesday, December 12, 2012 12:03 AM by Jim Loddengaard
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